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Apply by Feb. 16 for Journalism Fellowships on Immigrant Families

January 1, 2015

Children head to school in Dallas, an image from a eight-part multimedia project about first-generation Texans, produced by 2014 IJJ Fellow Stella M. Chávez for KERA public radio. Photo by Christina Ulsh/KERA.

Children head to school in Dallas, an image from a eight-part multimedia project about first-generation Texans, produced by 2014 IJJ Fellow Stella M. Chávez for KERA public radio. Photo by Christina Ulsh/KERA.

In five years, one in three children in the United States will be from immigrant families. They are the fastest-growing group of American children and are shaping the future of our country. The educational, economic and social issues faced by immigrant children and their families — and how they impact the rest of society — will be the focus of  a fellowship program organized by the Institute for Justice & Journalism.

Up to 16 journalists will be chosen to attend the conference, to be held April 7-10 at Georgia State University in Atlanta. IJJ will pay for travel and other expenses.

As part of their applications, journalists must propose an enterprise project on immigrant children and families for publication or broadcast. Each fellow will receive a $500 stipend upon completion of the story project.

The conference will include:

  • A seminar on immigration law with attorney Dan Kowalski, a very popular teacher and editor of Bender’s Immigration Bulletin.
  • A hands-on workshop on investigative techniques with Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Martha Mendoza of the Associated Press, an acclaimed FOIA expert.
  • An interactive workshop on finding and interpreting data with Laura Speer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, who oversees the Kids Count Data Center, which collects and analyzes the most comprehensive and latest statistics about U.S. children.
  • Panel discussions with experts on health issues, education inequities and upcoming legislation impacting immigrant families. There will be special emphasis on the South, where immigrant families are growing the fastest and children face some of the biggest hurdles in health and well-being.

 

Read more about our program, review application requirements and learn more about past fellows and their projects. Applications are due Feb. 16.

IJJ is a Berkeley, Calif.-based nonprofit that promotes better journalism about social justice issues by providing training, funding stories and convening data hackathons. Our 2015 fellowship is funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which is dedicated to helping build better futures for disadvantaged children.

Here’s what past fellows have said about IJJ’s training:

Stella M. Chávez, KERA public radio in Dallas: “The fellowship inspired me to do better work and push myself to find stories that haven’t been done before.”

Andrea Castillo, The Oregonian: “I filled notepads with new story ideas and issues I hadn’t thought to look into before. I walked away with a long list of resources and the names of several journalists to take inspiration from.”

Hansi Lo Wang, NPR: “I found a solid network of colleagues and experts who are committed to a broader narrative about immigration in America.”

Elly Yu, Georgia Public Broadcasting: “My experience at the conference allowed me to dive into a wealth of resources on immigration reporting that I didn’t know even existed.”

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